International Comparative Policy Analysis Forum (ICPA-Forum)

Affiliated with the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis www.jcpa.ca

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Call For Papers:

Contact the ICPA-Forum


The Role of Theory in Comparative Policy Analysis

Abstract Deadline: EXTENDED June 10, 2014
Notification of accepted proposals: July 15, 2014
Draft Paper Deadline: August 15, 2014

 

The aim of this 12th ICPA-Forum and JCPA  WORKSHOP is to reflect and hopefully improve our understanding of theory in Comparative Policy Analysis.

 

Comparative Policy Analysis is an essential part of both the academic world and the world of policy making. Although there may be different degrees to which these worlds accept each other, the relation of both is usually described as antagonistic if not at antipodes. On the one hand this did not prevent Comparative Policy Analysis from having become an extensive research industry – but mainly at the level of comparisons of a small number of entities – usually two nations, without pretentions of theory development or application.

 

On the other hand Comparative Policy Analysis is a methodological on-going challenge which needs to be addressed, if the results can be said to have any validity, reliability, and robustness.

 

Thus, this Workshop intends to inquire whether Comparative Policy Analysis can profit if:  (1) policy analytical theory can be improved -- especially if we can apply an instrumental definition of theory; (2) we can identify and integrate key elements which are of crucial importance in real world policy making.

 

Fundamentally, this symposium explores what ‘the academic world’ should and can do to get closer to its fundamentals and we will focus on two important elements of the hybrid status of theory in comparative policy analysis:

  • the instrumental aspect of theory (e.g. in its pragmatic tradition); and,
  • how to deal with space and time as central vectors or change and dynamics as vital powers in policy making.

Selection:

The criteria for selection are quality and fit to the subject matter, as well as a clear comparative analytic orientation following the Aims and Scope of the JCPA as stated below Thus, papers need not necessarily be comparisons among countries, but they must explicitly lend themselves to lesson-drawing, inference or generalization across sectors and jurisdictions. Once abstracts are accepted by the Special Issue Guest Editor, papers will be externally blindfold refereed according to the JCPA's standard procedures and the papers will be included in a Special Issue on the topic.

A selection of contributions will be published in a special issue of The Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, following the Journal’s standard double blindfold reviewing process.

Articles must be relevant to the topic of the special issue, and in line with the explicit criteria set by Aims and Scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, giving priority to comparative studies that:

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables
  7. Focus on one or more of the above mentioned variables (time, space, change, dynamics)

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 300 words, must be submitted to the Special Issue Guest Editors by May 15, 2014. An answer will be provided by June 15, 2014.  Final drafts must be submitted by 15 August, 2014, and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines; all articles are subject to double-blind review.

 

Special Issue Guest Editors:
Klaus Schubert, Institute of Political Science, WWU Muenster, (klaus.schubert@uni-muenster.de)



Professional Knowledge and Policy Work

Abstract Deadline:May 1, 2013
Notification of accepted proposals: May 15, 2013
Draft Paper Deadline: June 30, 2013

 

 

The professionalisation of policy practice has been accompanied (particularly in North America) by a focus on the knowledge required for policy work – ‘policy analysis’ - and the creation of graduate courses which could equip people with this knowledge and prepare them for work as ‘policy analysts’, who would bring the appropriate knowledge to bear and ‘advise’ the ‘policy-makers’ of the optimal course of action. But the people appointed as policy analysts turned out to be doing a wide range of tasks, few of which looked much like the analytic method in which they had been trained (if, indeed, they had been specifically trained; many had not). But if they were called policy analysts, then what they were doing must be policy analysis (see, e.g. Radin 2000, Weimer and Vining 2005, Howlett 2009).

But how would this new knowledge relate to other forms of knowledge, and to existing policy practice ? It was tacitly assumed that analysis would produce a superior truth, which ‘the policy makers’ would accept because it was generated by systematic method. But in practice, even if policy analysis was carried out and advice given, it was difficult to see its impact. It was clear that there are a number of different sorts of knowledge in play, and for policy workers, the task was not so much the mastery of a specific mode of analysis, but how knowledge might have meaning in a crowded and contested policy arena.

This symposium focuses on the interaction between different sorts of knowledge (and the people who mobilize them). It asks what sorts of knowledge are brought to bear in policy practice, by what sorts of people, and in what ways. It is particularly (but not only) interested in contributions which throw light on –

 

a) The ways in which forms of specialised knowledge take shape and are recognised in policy activity.  Traditional policy analysis created a methodology of choice grounded in microeconomics, which then had to contend with a number of other forms of knowledge – notably, but not only, professional knowledge - that are already established . 

 

b) How policy participants relate to different forms of knowledge, and how they draw upon them. Sometimes their place in the game is defined by their knowledge (e.g. ‘Chief Medical Officer’) but this may not be the only form of knowledge on which they draw. Knowledge is not self-propelled in policy fields, but is mobilised and brought to bear by specific participants or institutionalised requirements.

 

c) How policy participants frame the context in which knowledge is to be mobilised, and whose knowledge becomes relevant.  

 

Selection:

The criteria for selection are quality and fit to the subject matter, as well as a clear comparative analytic orientation following the Aims and Scope of the JCPA as stated below Thus, papers need not necessarily be comparisons among countries, but they must explicitly lend themselves to lesson-drawing, inference or generalization across sectors and jurisdictions. Once abstracts are accepted by the Special Issue Guest Editor, papers will be externally blindfold refereed according to the JCPA's standard procedures and the papers will be included in a Special Issue on the topic.

Articles must be relevant to the topic of the special issue, and in line with the explicit criteria set by Aims and Scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, giving priority to comparative studies that:

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables.

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 500 words, must be submitted to the Special Issue Guest Editors by May 1, 2013. An answer will be provided by May 15, 2013.  Final drafts must be submitted by 30 June, 2013, should be approximately 7,500 words and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines; all articles are subject to double-blind review.

.

Special Issue Guest Editors:
H.K. Colebatch, University of New South Wales (h.colebatch@unsw.edu.au)

 

 

 

Validating Methods For Comparing Public Policy:
Academia And Government In Dialogue

Abstract Deadline:May 15th, 2013

Notification of accepted proposals: June 15th, 2013
Draft Paper Deadline: September 30th, 2013

Workshop Date and Venue:27-30 November 2013

Public Management Institute of the KU Leuven, Belgium


Invitation:

“Comparative public policy” has become a much used term and practice in recent years. It is not clear, however, whether and to what extent academics and practitioners have exploited methods of comparison to their full potential. In collaboration with KULeuven, the JCPA-Journal and ICPA-Forum, which have raised comparative public policy analysis on the scholarly agenda more than a decade ago, seek to open a dialogue and discuss advances in comparative research design, policy analysis, construction and validation of comparative knowledge of manipulable policies, programs and policy institutions. This two-days conference addresses the question of how academics practice methods of comparison; as well, it seeks to generate an advanced understanding of the methods of comparison used by national governments and international institutions.

Under this call for papers, there are four sub-streams, inviting:

1. Scholars to present academic practices of comparison aiming to apply, validate or develop theories:


- Advances in comparative public policy knowledge through quantitative comparative research
- Advances in comparative public policy knowledge through qualitative comparative research
- Advances in comparative public policy knowledge through mixed methods’ research
- Interpretative policy analysis and comparative public policy knowledge
- Fuzzy set QCA for systematically comparing configurations of cases and their attributes context
- Comparative public policy knowledge from small-N and single case research

2. Scholars and practitioners to present practices of comparison of national governments
and international institutions aiming to draw lessons from single or multi-case comparators:


- Methods and use of international comparators
- Policy learning and transfer
- Comparison and policy evaluation
- Peer learning and open method of co-ordination in the EU or other federal systems
- Where to go with comparative databases and statistics?
- Mode II research: contextualized knowledge for comparative purposes

3. PHD students to present their comparative research designs and findings on comparative
public policy:

- Quantitative comparative research designs
- Qualitative comparative research designs
- Mixed methods research designs

4. Teachers of comparative public policy to present poster proposals on teaching
comparative knowledge and methods to students


Plenary sessions:
- Keynote: “Purpose, value, and constraints of comparative public policy analysis” TBA
- Luncheon Keynote from OECD, UNESCO or World Bank Representative TBA
- Roundtable Debate “Towards a better match between comparative policy analysis and policy-making:
What institutions want from comparative research and what comparative
research wants from institutions “ TBA
- Roundtable Debate: “Towards a methodology of comparative public policy analysis” TBA


Submission:

May 15th; 300 words; indicate name, affiliation, position, substream preference and send to:
Marleen.Brans@soc.kuleuven.be and cc: Sylvia.Tutenel@soc.kuleuven.be

Questions
Contact Marleen Brans (Marleen.Brans@soc.kuleuven.be) for any questions about this special issue in JCPA.

 

 

Policy Change in Comparative Contexts

Abstract Deadline:May 1, 2012

Notification of accepted proposals: May 15, 2012
Draft Paper Deadline: End of Summer, 2012

Workshop Date and Venue:August, 2012

University of Colorado at Denver, USA


Invitation:

This special issue for the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis seeks to contribute to the ongoing study of policy change in comparative contexts (see JCPA collection 2009). The focus will be on developing insight into policy change across countries from both theoretical and empirical aspects. This special issue will contribute to the continued development of the policy process literature and, in particular, the ongoing refinement of the advocacy coalition framework (ACF). To date, a vast majority of studies using the ACF have been in North America and Western Europe. This special issue seeks to test the framework's applicability across international contexts and as a tool for comparative policy analysis. This special issue also aims to deepen our knowledge about how policy change occurs by seeking lessons from across political systems, such as how do institutions, culture, policy-relevant beliefs, or problem attributes shape the policy change process; what are the intervening steps linking events to policy change; how might learning and negotiated agreements lead to policy change; and how important are changes in the distribution of resources within and among coalitions as well as the role of policy brokers in policy change?

Paper Requirement:

This special issue will feature articles dedicated to the topic of policy change guided by the ACF with a strong preference for applications outside of the North America and Western Europe and for applications that can compare policy change between countries.  Abstracts will be no more than 200 words.  All submitted papers will be subject to the same peer-review process as any submitted manuscript to JCPA and must not exceed 8,000 words. Abstract acceptance does not guarantee publication in JCPA. The abstracts will be sent to Chris Weible (Chris.Weible@ucdenver.edu).

 

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Dr. Adam Henry, West Virginia University, USA
Dr. Karin Ingold, Bern University, Switzerland
Dr. Daniel Nohrstedt, Uppsala University, Sweden
Dr. Chris Weible, University of Colorado Denver, USA

Questions
Contact Chris Weible (Chris.Weible@ucdenver.edu) for any questions about this special issue in JCPA.

 

 

Policy Analysis at Times of Crises: Windows of Opportunity for Policy Learning?

Abstract Deadline:April 1, 2012

Notification of accepted proposals: May 1, 2012
Draft Paper Deadline: Oct 23, 2012

Workshop Date and Venue:Nov 23, 2012

Erasmus University of Rotterdam, The Netherlands


Invitation:

Policy analysis has played a central role in the rise of modern government. Throughout europe and beyond, policy analysis has been a key factor in the development of policies and has contributed to the type of modern government being driven not only by powering or the normative and political struggle on policies but also by puzzling or the rational and informed question for what policies work best (Heclo 1974). This key role of policy analysis has also contributed to the evolution of policy analysis as a research field as well as a research industry. as a research field, policy analysis has matured into a theoretically rich and increasingly diverse field, including beyond the traditional rationalistic model, new schools of thought such as (historical-) institutionalism, constructivism and more pluralist approaches. as a research industry, policy analysis has not only become a key area of activity at universities, but increasingly also in advisory bodies, think tanks and also within government organizations itself. This role of policy analysis is challenged by what is sometimes considered as crises in various facets of modern government. The current financial crisis challenges the financial institutions worldwide, the welfare state crisis is testing how societies organize solidarity and cope with so-called new social risks associated with individualization and post-industrialization, the migration crisis is challenging how we cope with diversity and perhaps even the very perception of bounded nation states, and the security crisis is challenging the way we think of risks and defense at times of globalization. These multifaceted crises put the role that policy analysis can play to the test. The main questions that this Call for Papers seeks to address are: What contribution can policy analysis make to government (or 'governance') while the current crises are rapidly transforming or even undermining many of the institutions at which policy analysis was traditionally orientated? How can policy analysis accommodate the rapid and often unpredictable transformations that are currently taking place, as well as accommodate the uncertainty of knowledge that is generally associated with these transformations? How can policy analysis provide expert efficient answers in states of crisis? Is it really the case that, at times of rapid change and uncertainty, institutionalist and rationalist perspectives fail to provide explanations for policy learning? Do we experience that crises bring about a primacy for powering instead of puzzling, and for narrative construction rather than knowledge and information and how can this be addressed? a critical confrontation of the evidence from the various contributions will enable us to rethink the role of policy analysis at times of crisis. each of the contributions will analyze how in a specific facet of the crisis chances for policy learning have and can be created. With the focus on environmental public policies, we invite an examination of how the implementation of international agreements, regimes, and/or organizations transforms or informs domestic policy processes through institutional, social or ideational mechanisms. Possible themes include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Comparative analysis of mechanisms for treaty implementation
  2. Cross country analyses of the effects of international organizations’ policy advice
  3. International organizations/treaties and cross border policy diffusion
  4. Advocacy and compliance in a comparative perspective
  5. Advocacy strategies in domestic and international policy arenas
  6. Domestic resistance to international policy instruments

Selection:

The criteria for selection are quality and fit to the subject matter, as well as a clear comparative analytic orientation following the Aims and Scope of the JCPA as stated below Thus, papers need not necessarily be comparisons among countries, but they must explicitly lend themselves to lesson-drawing, inference or generalization across sectors and jurisdictions. Once abstracts are accepted by the Special Issue Guest Editor, the papers will be recommended for inclusion and presentation in the proceedings of the 9th International Comparative PolicyAnalysis-Forum Annual Workshop (Symposium), hosted by School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney. Following discussions and input at the Workshop, final papers will be externally blindfold refereed according to the JCPA's standard procedures and the papers will be included in a Special Issue on the topic.

Articles must be in line with the specific policy domain on which this Workshop focuses – environmentalpolicies, and particularly, with the explicit criteria set byAims and Scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, giving priority to comparative studies that:

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables.

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 500 words, must be submitted to the Special Issue Guest Editors by March 1, 2012. Ananswer will be provided by May 1, 2012. If accepted following blindfold review, the article drafts should be approximately 7,500 words and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines.

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Frans K.M. van Nispen and P.W.A. Scholten, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The
Netherlands vannispen@fsw.eur.nl

 

Domestic and Intra–Nations Environmental Policies: Comparative Approaches

Abstract Deadline:Feb 1, 2012

Notification of accepted proposals: March 15, 2012
Draft Paper Deadline: May 15

Workshop Date and Venue: June 12–13, 2012

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney


Invitation:

With globalization and the continued proliferation of international agreements and organizations (both governmental and non-governmental), the lines between domestic and international policy processes are increasingly blurred. This is particularly visible in the domain of environmental policies. Domestic policy actors appeal to international venues to affect policy change; transnational organizations shape problem definitions and solutions that are implemented through domestic legislation; domestic bureaucracies engage in international forums, learning how to implement internationally based policies or shaping how other countries implement those policies. This workshop/symposium builds on the growing scholarship that bridges the divide between two strands of political science: international relations and public policy processes. Key issues in international relations involve cooperation, treaty making and regime formation, and their implementation and efficacy. While there has been attention to domestic politics in shaping ratificationprocesses and politics and how domestic institutions shape cooperative agreement, this workshop/symposium examines what happens after ratification—a key focus of the literature on policy processes and a growing field of inquiry in implementing international agreements. With the focus on environmental public policies, we invite an examination of how the implementation of international agreements, regimes, and/or organizations transforms or informs domestic policy processes through institutional, social or ideational mechanisms. Possible themes include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Comparative analysis of mechanisms for treaty implementation
  2. Cross country analyses of the effects of international organizations’ policy advice
  3. International organizations/treaties and cross border policy diffusion
  4. Advocacy and compliance in a comparative perspective
  5. Advocacy strategies in domestic and international policy arenas
  6. Domestic resistance to international policy instruments

Selection:

The criteria for selection are quality and fit to the subject matter, as well as a clear comparative analytic orientation following the Aims and Scope of the JCPA as stated below Thus, papers need not necessarily be comparisons among countries, but they must explicitly lend themselves to lesson-drawing, inference or generalization across sectors and jurisdictions. Once abstracts are accepted by the Special Issue Guest Editor, the papers will be recommended for inclusion and presentation in the proceedings of the 9th International Comparative PolicyAnalysis-Forum Annual Workshop (Symposium), hosted by School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney. Following discussions and input at the Workshop, final papers will be externally blindfold refereed according to the JCPA’s standard procedures and the papers will be included in a Special Issue on the topic.

Articles must be in line with the specific policy domain on which this Workshop focuses – environmental policies, and particularly, with the explicit criteria set byAims and Scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, giving priority to comparative studies that:

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables.

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 500 words, must be submitted to the Special Issue Guest Editor by February 1, 2012. Ananswer will be provided by March 15, 2012. If accepted following blindfold review, the article drafts should be approximately 7,500 words and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines. Final paper versions will be submitted to the (appropriate) Special Issue Guest Editors (as above) by May 15, 2012.

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Betsi Beem, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia.
betsi.beem@sydney.edu.au

 

Immigration and its Impact on Human Capital Development

Abstract Deadline:January 15, 2011

Notification of accepted proposals: February 15, 2012
Draft Paper Deadline: May 15

Workshop Date and Venue: April 15, 2012


Invitation:

Immigration is a heavily contested topic around the world; the issue is under much debate in the United States Congress. The recent failure of the passage of Dream Act, in some ways, is an indication of the nation’s deeply divided view on this issue. Legal immigration also has faced its own share of challenges post 9/11. Skilled migration from developing countries to the U.S. has long been seen as a one-way process or brain drain. If some skilled migrants entertained the idea of returning, it was considered unlikely or impractical. This, however, has been changing as globalization is radically transforming the way people move around the world. Though the United States dominates the world in being able to attract the best talent from around the globe, rapid development in transportation and communication systems has transformed the way we think about national boundaries. To address these issues, we welcome papers that will examine issues of immigration in a comparative way from both local and global perspectives and assess its impact on human capital development. Possible themes include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Comparative analysis of high skilled immigration policies
  2. High skilled immigration policies in domestic and international arena
  3. Cross country analyses of the effects of immigration
  4. Challenges and opportunities of high skilled immigration in a global world
  5. Brain drain and Brain gain in a global world

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 500 words, must be submitted to the special issue editor by December 15th, 2011. Notification will be provided by January 15th 2012. The article drafts should be between 4,000-5,000 words and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines. They will be submitted to the special issue editor by April 15th, 2012.

Selection:

The criteria for selection is quality and fit to the subject matter. The articles submitted must be in line with the aims and scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis. While not all papers should be comparisons among countries, for instance, they must explicitly lend themselves to lesson-drawing inference or generalization across sectors and jurisdictions. Once accepted by the special issue editor, all submitted papers will be externally refereed according to the JCPA’s blind-fold standard procedures.

Articles must be in line with the explicit criteria set by Aims and Scope of the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, giving priority to comparative studies that:

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables.

Submission:

An abstract of no more than 500 words, must be submitted to the Special Issue Guest Editor by February 1, 2012. An answer will be provided by March 15, 2012. If accepted following blindfold review, the article drafts should be approximately 7,500 words and their format must follow the JCPA guidelines. Final paper versions will be submitted to the (appropriate) Special Issue Guest Editors (as above) by May 15, 2012.

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Dr. Meghna Sabharwal, Assistant Professor, School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas, meghna.sabharwal@utdallas.edu

 

Public Policy: Brazil in a Comparative Perspective

Abstract Deadline:September 1st 2011

Notification of accepted proposals: September 15th 2011
Draft Paper Deadline: October 25th 2011

Workshop Date and Venue: 18-19 November 2011 – Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas


Invitation:

The transformation of policy in Brazil and South America since transitions to democracy from military rule in the region, experiences with the stabilization and liberalization of domestic economies and the incorporation of advances in information technologies have profoundly changed public administration and government. This ICPA Symposium is an opportunity to present original research that contributes to understanding the advances and challenges for policy in Brazil and South America. Issues of public policy and public administration instruction in Graduate Schools, serving as a pipeline for better public service, will also be considered. Intra- and cross-country comparative studies will be favored over case studies, as well as studies adhering to the six criteria for Comparative work as outlined by the JCPA.

  1. Contribute to comparative theory development
  2. Present theory-based empirical research
  3. Offer comparative evaluations of research methods
  4. Derive the practice implications of theory-based research
  5. Use conceptual heuristics to interpret practice
  6. Draw lessons based on circumstances in which compared policy related issues have in common certain manipulable policy, program or institutional variables.

Selection:

Paper proposals will be evaluated for empirical and theoretical contribution to understanding of recent advances and challenges for public policy in Brazil and South America. A selection committee will review paper proposals and papers presented at the October 21-22 symposium for a Special Issue in the JCPA. The papers will be further blind-fold peer reviewed in accord with JCPA´s editorial policies for publication in the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis.

Submission:

Paper proposals with title, author(s) and abstract < 500 words should be submitted to kurt.mettenheim@fgv.br by July 1, 2011 in WORD or PDF file attached to email with subject title “Paper Submission for ICPA Symposium on Public Policy in Brazil and Latin America.” Acceptance letters for presentation at symposium will be sent August 15, 2011. Papers for presentation to symposium and consideration for publication must be submitted to kurt.mettenheim@fgv.br by October 15, 2011.

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Fernando Luiz Abrucio, Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas

Marta Ferreira Santos Farah, Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas

Regina Sylvia Pacheco, Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas

Special Issue Guest Editor

Kurt von Mettenheim, Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas

 

Comparative Policy Statistics: A New Section of JCPA

Abstract Deadline: Ongoing
Draft Paper Deadline: Ongoing

Invitation:

The JCPA will regularly feature a new section entitled, comparative statistics. We invite submissions and proposals focusing on all aspects of policy measurement and every kind of data analysis with a comparative twist. We are especially interested in indices such as Transparency International’s perceived corruption index, league tables, comparative indicators of economic and social wellbeing, learning, public performance, capital access, or demographics. We will publish articles on statistical methodology and measurement practices as well. Why, for example, do Interpol and the UN publish different figures on violent crimes? We would be especially interested in looking at papers that debunk statistics widely used in the formulation of public policies or that explain their divergence. For example, almost no two countries on earth use the same discount rate in evaluating public projects. Where they coincide, the justification is rarely the same. Even in the European Union, prescribed rates have not converged despite the use of a common currency. Why? If you have an idea for a paper, contact the section editor, Fred Thompson, Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University, Oregon. Submissions should run 4, 000 - 5,000 words, but should be amply supported with tables, charts, and figures. All articles will be refereed.

Section Editor:

Dr. Fred Thompson, Grace & Elmer Goudy Professor of Public Management & Policy, Willamette University

 

Policy Innovation

      Abstract Deadline: Ongoing
      Paper Deadline: Ongoing

Invitation:
The purpose of the "Policy Innovation" section is to advance comparative studies by reporting on specific innovative policies that have actually been adopted by national or sub-national governments and are undergoing implementation. Innovative policies may be in any policy area: social welfare policy, health care, environment, transportation, regulation, pensions, and so forth. We encourage submissions on policy innovation from any region of the world.


Submissions will be considered to the extent they adhere to the Aims & Scope of the JCPA - and in the case of this special section - the extent to which submissions meet the following criteria: (a) description of the policy in detail; (b) explanation as to why the policy is unique or unusual; (c) an evaluation of an initial experience with the new policy (i.e., any evidence of success or unintended consequences); and (d) description of the particular political, bureaucratic and social circumstances that led to the adoption of the policy.


It is generally expected that submitted papers will normally be somewhat shorter than the normal submission (approximately 15-20 typed double-space pages). Submissions to this section of the journal will be evaluated by the section co-editors: Anthony Boardman (University of British Columbia) and Aidan Vining (Simon Fraser University). All submissions to the JCPA are strictly blindfold reviewed.

Section Editors:

Anthony Boardman, Van Dusen Professor of Business Administration, University of British ColumbiaAidan Vining, CNABS Professor of Business and Government Relations, Simon Fraser University - Vancouver.

Submission Contacts:

       Please send all submissions to Diana Walker at jcpa@sfu.ca